A look at Open House

Event stresses importance of parent-teacher relationships

A+student+and+his+parent+in+front+of+the+library+at+this+year%27s+open+house.+Parents+and+their+children+often+go+to+open+house+to+look+at+clubs%2C+organizations%2C+and+other+information.

Gigi Allen

A student and his parent in front of the library at this year's open house. Parents and their children often go to open house to look at clubs, organizations, and other information.

by Gigi Allen, Staff Writer

Open House was a success for some teachers this year, but for others, students and their parents did not attend.

“I think a parent teacher relationship is incredibly important,” freshman and junior AP English teacher Ms. Ribas said. “That is why I send home the trusted adult assignment, because the parents send information that the student doesn’t think of right away. It helps me be proactive.”

Open House is used as a place where parents of the student body can meet their children’s teachers. Clubs can also set up booths to provide information to the students. It is a time for freshman to get involved, but can also be utilized to promote new clubs started or the revamping of old clubs. Teachers also can ask the parents for supplies that they need for their classroom, or simply connect more with a face to face meeting.

“I mostly use that night as a way to introduce myself to the parents and welcome them into their child’s education,” Ribas said. “ A lot of parents wrote me emails about my students and I wrote back so most people that came were to meet me in person. I just think it is fantastic to see how many students showed up with their families and I left feeling re-charged.”

Teachers of upperclassman have a noticeably lesser turn out, so they count on their students to bring in the supplies they need. Things like tissues and batteries become a required item they have to constantly ask for.

“When you are teaching upperclassmen, the parents usually know what is going on,” Algebra II teacher Mr.Washington said. “The older kids just don’t come like the younger ones.”