Leander High School's online student-run newspaper

The Roar

Leander High School's online student-run newspaper

The Roar

Leander High School's online student-run newspaper

The Roar

Get the Facts Straight: SAG-AFTRA and WGA Strike
Just Keep Swimming
Get the Facts Straight: Fentanyl
Things You May Not Know About LHS

Things You May Not Know About LHS

February 7, 2023

New Years Resolutions

New Years Resolutions

January 30, 2023

Aydin Maredia
Aydin Maredia
Photojournalist
Sophia Smith
Sophia Smith
Co-editor in chief

How Thin Is Too Thin

Beautiful is defined as possessing qualities that give great pleasure or satisfaction to see, hear, think about, etc.; excellent of its kind; wonderful; the ideal of beauty. Today’s models are said to be beautiful, but is the size triple zero really “ideal”? Starving yourself in order to be considered beautiful seems preposterous.

In 2012, most models qualified for anorexia, and size six is a plus size. Twenty years ago, the average model weighed eight percent less than the average woman. Now, it’s 23 percent less. Plus size models have gone from being size 12 – 18 to size 6 – 14. In 2012, about 50 percent of women wore a size 14 or larger. That means if all women were models, about half of them would be a plus size or unqualified to be a model.

Today, these “beautiful” women are seen everywhere: magazines, television, posters, billboards, showcase windows in stores, and on the runway. Since they are in so many places, it’s almost impossible to not see them and perhaps be “awestruck.” Most women, even young girls, see this and think, “Wow, I want to be just like her,” and strive to be what’s considered beautiful: a stick with clothes hanging off of her. A stick isn’t healthy. Thin, not skinny with bones poking through, but thin with meat on those bones and being able to fill clothes, that’s healthy.

Due to these paper-thin models, women, even teenage girls, starve themselves because they want to be that version of beautiful. More than 90% of those afflicted with eating disorders are adolescent and young adult women. About one percent of adolescent girls develop a disorder called anorexia nervosa. This disorder is dangerous because it allows the person who has it to starve to death. Two to three percent of young women develop bulimia nervosa, overeating followed by vomiting or other “purging” behaviors. One in ten cases ends in death from starvation, cardiac arrest, or suicide, all to achieve that “ideal” figure.

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There are better ways to maintain a healthy body weight than making oneself sick or starving oneself. Eating right, exercise, and staying away from “junk food” are some of the most basic ways to stay healthy. It may be hard at first, but it’s worth it; it’s definitely better than the alternative.

The size zero and below models that are seen everywhere are thought of as beautiful, but what’s truly beautiful and ideal is the person underneath the skin. Weight is just a number, but the person who looks at that number with tears in their eyes, they aren’t “just a number.” They are so much more.

 

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About the Contributor
Siandhara Bonnet, Editor-In-Chief
Siandhara Bonnet, Editor-In-Chief, is an ecstatic senior with a full calendar. Along with her passion for Journalism, Siandhara keeps her schedule busy with meetings and activities for Student Council, C-Squared, Green Paws, and Tutors Inc. That doesn’t stop her though, from being a top-notch student enrolled in the IB Program. After high school, Siandhara has plans to attend Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Oklahoma after she graduates, with a major in Journalism and a minor in Photography.